M+ Matters: Post-1949 Visual and Material Culture in China

‘M+ Matters: Post-1949 Visual and Material Culture in China’ is a public talk that considers critical issues in the first decades of the socialist state in China through a multidisciplinary lens, examining design and visual art. Bringing together three international scholars and curators, it aims to propose new ways of appraising the highly complex narratives of socialist cultural production in China, which have often been overlooked by historians.

 

The talk consists of three presentations:

‘Everyday Desirables: What Wristwatches, Sewing Machines, and Bicycles Can Tell Us about Mao-Era China’
Karl Gerth (Hwei-Chih and Julia Hsiu Endowed Chair in Chinese Studies and Professor of History, Department of History, University of California, San Diego)

‘New China’s Showcase: The China Pavilion at the Leipzig Fairs in East Germany’
Jennifer Altehenger (Lecturer in Contemporary Chinese History, Department of History, King’s College London)

‘Crossing the Pacific: A Hidden History’
Zheng Shengtian (Adjunct Director, Institute of Asian Art, Vancouver Art Gallery)

 

A conversation will follow the talk, with the participation of the speakers and Denise Ho (Assistant Professor of History, Department of History, Yale University), Pi Li (Sigg Senior Curator, Visual Art, M+), and Shirley Surya (Associate Curator, Design and Architecture, M+).

 

Date: 5 July 2018 (Thursday)
Time: 6:30pm–8:30pm
Venue: Miller Theater, Asia Society Hong Kong Center, 9 Justice Drive, Admiralty, Hong Kong

Language: English with simultaneous interpretation in Cantonese and Mandarin.

Free admission. Limited capacity on a first-come, first-served basis.

Register now: http://bit.ly/2tuihLB
Details: www.westkowloon.hk/en/mplusmatters

 

This edition of M+ Matters is organised by Shirley Surya (Associate Curator, Design and Architecture, M+) and Jennifer Wong (Assistant Curator, Design and Architecture, M+), with Jennifer Altehenger (Lecturer in Contemporary Chinese History, Department of History, King's College London) and Denise Ho (Assistant Professor of History, Department of History, Yale University), and is partially funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.